The Puff Cuff Pop Up Salon Event In Atlanta, Ga

I had the pleasure of attending The Puff Cuff Pop Up Salon on yesterday in Atlanta. The event atmosphere was so welcoming and uplifting. If you have been thinking of starting your own business you definitely miss out on an inspiring event. To see black small business owners motivating each other and complimenting each other was amazing.

What is The Puff Cuff?

PuffCuff Hair Clamp is designed to GRASP your hair, lock into its texture and hold hair in a puff style. Our original 5″ PuffCuff is demonstrated above. The unique teeth are designed to hold the clamp in place, NOT to glide through the hair like a comb or the old “banana clip”. Even though the look of the PuffCuff is similar to the old “banana clip” it DOES NOT function the same.

HOW TO USE YOUR PUFF CUFF:

1. If you have extremely thick hair, you may want to dampen it with water or your favorite moisturizer.

2. Gather hair as if creating a ponytail.

3. While holding hair, INSERT (we stress INSERT) the teeth of one arm of the PuffCuff into the hair at the base of puff, as close to the scalp as possible.

4. While still holding gathered hair, use free hand to insert teeth of the opposite arm into hair as close to the base of puff on the opposite side of the head.

5. Do NOT let go of gathered hair. Insert both arms into the hair at the base of puff, push arms toward each other overlapping the hooks. Gently pull arms in opposite direction to interlock hooks and close the clamp.

6. Let go of gathered hair. Fluff and enjoy a painless puff!

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Who is the founder and why did she create The Puff Cuff?

CEATA E. LASH

 

When I decided to change my lifestyle and make the transition from relaxed to natural hair, I discovered that it was impossible to find accessories to accommodate the thickness and texture of my hair. Searching in stores and online, I realized that most accessories on the market are designed for straight, thin hair – NOT for my naturally thick, coarse hair! Existing products cinched my hair to its smallest point of resistance, creating “bunny tail hair” (not a good look for a grown woman), hair breakage, damage to the accessory and pure frustration for me!

I became determined to find a solution, but it just didn’t exist. As I became more aware of other African American women making the same transition — all with similar hair texture and hairstyles, it became clear we all had the same need for an easy-to-use styling tool that would help us achieve quick looks without stressing our hair. We also needed it to be sanitary, durable and affordable. A little more research revealed that there were others — men and women with curly hair, locs and braids — who were experiencing the same styling woes. It was then that the concept of the PuffCuff was born, but I wouldn’t let myself imagine that I could be the one to invent, manufacture and retail it myself. And, then, inspiration moved in.

In the fall of 2011, I was blessed to have my 99-year-old grandmother come to live with my family and I. She had been diagnosed with congestive heart failure and was close to death. My grandmother was my heart and I loved her dearly. In our quiet moments together; I often wondered, “Did she do everything she wanted to in her long life? Did she pursue all her dreams?” The answer was a resounding and confident, “YES.” She was at total peace in knowing her time was at hand. So I thought, ‘Would I be at peace with how my life turned out if the Lord blessed me to live to her age?” Knowing I might not get 99 years, if I put this idea on the shelf and left it there, I might not have the same kind of peace my grandmother had when death was imminent. I decided I had to at least try. If I failed, it wouldn’t be for a lack of trying. So here I am! PuffCuff LLC was launched in August of 2013. The first PuffCuff was available for purchase in February of 2014.

Here are photos from yesterdays event below!

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‘It is Imperative to Provide Art to Girls With Black and Brown Skin’

‘It is Imperative to Provide Art to Girls With Black and Brown Skin’: A Conversation With Founder & CEO of Yumme Brand by Toi Banks

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Founder & CEO Taaj Marjanee outside of Stetson Branch Library in New Haven, Connecticut after the first

Founder & CEO Taaj Marjanee outside of Stetson Branch Library in New Haven, Connecticut after the first “Brown & Black Crayon Conversation” event.

As the first feature of “Yes, Sis,” I will be highlighting Atlanta native and graphic design artist, Taaj Hubbard!

So, who is Taaj? Don’t worry…I got you!

Taaj – or Taaj Marjanee by her artist name – is the Founder and CEO of the Afro-urban and lifestyle, art company, Yumme Brand. Under this umbrella of a business, she creates and illustrates for the Color Me Yumme and Color Me Yumme International coloring books, which are specifically designed for Afro-descendant youth.

Why is this? Well, for the 26 year-old, Alabama State University Alumna, who is keenly aware of the limited to no representation of black girls in coloring books, the answer is simple: she wants to instill self-confidence and self-love in girls throughout the diaspora.

I had the opportunity to chat with the business woman and entrepreneur, who began this venture almost 4 years ago, and here’s what she has to say. Check it out!

When did you realize you had a passion for drawing & graphic design? I’ve had a passion for drawing from a very early age. I used to draw images I found in books, magazines, and photo albums. I realized my passion for graphic design in the summer of 2013. At that time, my mother noticed my drawings were good enough to display on t-shirts. So I thought, “lets give this a try”. I did not realize it at the time, however, this was the point in my life when Yumme Brand started to take shape. My business officially came into existence in August of 2017.

Color Me Yumme
As the first feature of “Yes, Sis,” I will be highlighting Atlanta native and graphic design artist, Taaj Hubbard!

So, who is Taaj? Don’t worry…I got you!

Taaj – or Taaj Marjanee by her artist name – is the Founder and CEO of the Afro-urban and lifestyle, art company, Yumme Brand. Under this umbrella of a business, she creates and illustrates for the Color Me Yumme and Color Me Yumme International coloring books, which are specifically designed for Afro-descendant youth.

Why is this? Well, for the 26 year-old, Alabama State University Alumna, who is keenly aware of the limited to no representation of black girls in coloring books, the answer is simple: she wants to instill self-confidence and self-love in girls throughout the diaspora.

I had the opportunity to chat with the business woman and entrepreneur, who began this venture almost 4 years ago, and here’s what she has to say. Check it out!

When did you realize you had a passion for drawing & graphic design? I’ve had a passion for drawing from a very early age. I used to draw images I found in books, magazines, and photo albums. I realized my passion for graphic design in the summer of 2013. At that time, my mother noticed my drawings were good enough to display on t-shirts. So I thought, “lets give this a try”. I did not realize it at the time, however, this was the point in my life when Yumme Brand started to take shape. My business officially came into existence in August of 2017.

Color Me Yumme
As the first feature of “Yes, Sis,” I will be highlighting Atlanta native and graphic design artist, Taaj Hubbard!

So, who is Taaj? Don’t worry…I got you!

Taaj – or Taaj Marjanee by her artist name – is the Founder and CEO of the Afro-urban and lifestyle, art company, Yumme Brand. Under this umbrella of a business, she creates and illustrates for the Color Me Yumme and Color Me Yumme International coloring books, which are specifically designed for Afro-descendant youth.

Why is this? Well, for the 26 year-old, Alabama State University Alumna, who is keenly aware of the limited to no representation of black girls in coloring books, the answer is simple: she wants to instill self-confidence and self-love in girls throughout the diaspora.

I had the opportunity to chat with the business woman and entrepreneur, who began this venture almost 4 years ago, and here’s what she has to say. Check it out!

When did you realize you had a passion for drawing & graphic design? I’ve had a passion for drawing from a very early age. I used to draw images I found in books, magazines, and photo albums. I realized my passion for graphic design in the summer of 2013. At that time, my mother noticed my drawings were good enough to display on t-shirts. So I thought, “lets give this a try”. I did not realize it at the time, however, this was the point in my life when Yumme Brand started to take shape. My business officially came into existence in August of 2017.

Color Me Yumme
As the first feature of “Yes, Sis,” I will be highlighting Atlanta native and graphic design artist, Taaj Hubbard!

So, who is Taaj? Don’t worry…I got you!

Taaj – or Taaj Marjanee by her artist name – is the Founder and CEO of the Afro-urban and lifestyle, art company, Yumme Brand. Under this umbrella of a business, she creates and illustrates for the Color Me Yumme and Color Me Yumme International coloring books, which are specifically designed for Afro-descendant youth.

Why is this? Well, for the 26 year-old, Alabama State University Alumna, who is keenly aware of the limited to no representation of black girls in coloring books, the answer is simple: she wants to instill self-confidence and self-love in girls throughout the diaspora.

I had the opportunity to chat with the business woman and entrepreneur, who began this venture almost 4 years ago, and here’s what she has to say. Check it out!

When did you realize you had a passion for drawing & graphic design? I’ve had a passion for drawing from a very early age. I used to draw images I found in books, magazines, and photo albums. I realized my passion for graphic design in the summer of 2013. At that time, my mother noticed my drawings were good enough to display on t-shirts. So I thought, “lets give this a try”. I did not realize it at the time, however, this was the point in my life when Yumme Brand started to take shape. My business officially came into existence in August of 2017.

Color Me Yumme
As the first feature of “Yes, Sis,” I will be highlighting Atlanta native and graphic design artist, Taaj Hubbard!

So, who is Taaj? Don’t worry…I got you!

Taaj – or Taaj Marjanee by her artist name – is the Founder and CEO of the Afro-urban and lifestyle, art company, Yumme Brand. Under this umbrella of a business, she creates and illustrates for the Color Me Yumme and Color Me Yumme International coloring books, which are specifically designed for Afro-descendant youth.

Why is this? Well, for the 26 year-old, Alabama State University Alumna, who is keenly aware of the limited to no representation of black girls in coloring books, the answer is simple: she wants to instill self-confidence and self-love in girls throughout the diaspora.

I had the opportunity to chat with the business woman and entrepreneur, who began this venture almost 4 years ago, and here’s what she has to say. Check it out!

When did you realize you had a passion for drawing & graphic design? I’ve had a passion for drawing from a very early age. I used to draw images I found in books, magazines, and photo albums. I realized my passion for graphic design in the summer of 2013. At that time, my mother noticed my drawings were good enough to display on t-shirts. So I thought, “lets give this a try”. I did not realize it at the time, however, this was the point in my life when Yumme Brand started to take shape. My business officially came into existence in August of 2017.

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme

Color Me Yumme
Color Me Yumme
Color Me Yumme
How did you decide to start a business in the field? Well at first I tried to sell t-shirts with my designs printed on them. However, this idea was not cost efficient. While I was interested in selling unique styled t-shirts, I was unaware of the time, cost, and dedication I had to have in order to be successful as an entrepreneur. This is when I learned the valuable lesson of “no pain, no gain” as a business owner. However, I am no quitter. I took the time to research and think of other ideas that were cost effective, creative, and catered to my community. In 2016, my mother and I came up with the brilliant idea to do holiday greeting cards for Muslims. I thought it was a fantastic idea because my family is Muslim and holiday greeting cards, specially made for Muslims, are not sold in stores. This is how I began to make a name for myself as an artist; specifically, as a graphic designer.

Within your graphic design services, do you specialize in any particular thing or what does that look like?
I specialize in drawing faces. I’m in love with drawing black faces, because our features are so bold and beautiful.

Tell us about Yumme Brand. Yumme Brand is amazing! It’s a business I created solely for girls of Afro-descent. I created Yumme Brand to let young black girls know that they are special and beautifully unique. I believe it is easy for women of color, especially, young women of Afro-descent to feel forgotten in this world. Therefore, it is imperative to provide art to girls of black and brown skin complexion. Yumme Brand is all about creative expression and showing young black and brown girls that they should feel proud of their magnificent features and heritage.

Miss Costa Rica

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.
Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.
Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.
Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.
Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia
Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Costa Rica. Her hair is styled in bantu knots representing her culture and big hoop earrings with dark red lips to enhance her style and beauty. You’ll notice Costa Rica sketched into her face, paying homage to her homeland and providing representation for the Afro Costa Rican people.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Bolivia

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Miss Bolivia. Her country, along with various others, is a part of the African Diaspora. The strong features in her face represent her African traits. You’ll also notice there’s a free hand sketch of Bolivia blended in with her face. This shows she is a part of her homeland, and her homeland a part of her.

Is there a correlation between the African Diaspora and Yumme Brand? How do you incorporate the diaspora in your images? Yes, there is a correlation. The latest project relates directly to the 29 countries that the United Nations recognizes where 250 million Afro-descendant of slaves still live. The term “African Diaspora” refers to the locations and communities where descendants of our ancestors were taken from Africa by way of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. I decided to create a second coloring book dedicated to girls who weren’t born in the U.S , but are a part of the African Diaspora, because I would never leave any of my sista’s out of this creation!

Some of the characters in your book have lines and other markings on their faces. Is this symbolic of something, and if so, what? The lines you are referring to are in “Color Me Yumme International Vol. I.” [They] create a continuous outline of the country or island from which the woman or girl resides.

What has been the most challenging aspect of building your brand? The most challenging aspect of building my brand has been maintaining consistent faith in my vision. There have been countless number of times, when I have questioned my capabilities and my vision for Yumme Brand. I have days and nights where I have been exhausted and weeks where I have been broke. However, these emotions and circumstances come with the territory of owning your own business, when you are attempting to make a ground-breaking impact on the world. These emotions are necessary for success, and I have no problem facing them. because I want to be successful. Often times small businesses tend to be short lived because they are not getting enough support. I have invested more money into my business than received and to be honest, it’s discouraging. However, I can see the result of my hard work and my future, and it is bright! I just have to continue working until I reach my goal. PERSEVERANCE is key in life and in being a business owner.

“,”source”:”In the video Taaj asks the participants what they see, and one of the young ladies says, “I see really really beautiful hair.”

“},”hSize”:null,”floatDir”:null,”html”:”“,”url”:”https://www.instagram.com/p/BdVCJwFHpJo/?taken-by=yummebrand”,”thumbnailUrl”:”https://scontent-iad3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/0b10d18374a5b6d0478a66ea0148a2e4/5A8D29EC/t51.2885-15/s640x640/sh0.08/e35/26065976_1657678520965921_4979700673437237248_n.jpg”,”resolvedBy”:”embedly”}” data-block-type=”32″>

<div class="sqs-video-wrapper video-none" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1519269009607_105" style="position: relative;" data-html="” data-provider-name=””>

What upcoming projects can we look forward to seeing from you and/or Yumme Brand? [Well], last year I was able to hold an event entitled ”The Brown & Black Crayon Conversation” at libraries across the United States. During these events, I had the opportunity to talk to young girls about the importance of self-identity, self-love, self-confidence, and why it’s important to always use specific colors when coloring faces that have the same features as they may have. I absolutely loved hosting those events, so I am definitely going to do more this year.

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

“,”source”:”In the video Taaj asks the participants what they see, and one of the young ladies says, “I see really really beautiful hair.”

“},”hSize”:null,”floatDir”:null,”html”:”“,”url”:”https://www.instagram.com/p/BdVCJwFHpJo/?taken-by=yummebrand&#8221;,”thumbnailUrl”:”https://scontent-iad3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/0b10d18374a5b6d0478a66ea0148a2e4/5A8D29EC/t51.2885-15/s640x640/sh0.08/e35/26065976_1657678520965921_4979700673437237248_n.jpg&#8221;,”resolvedBy”:”embedly”}” data-block-type=”32″>

<div class="sqs-video-wrapper video-none" id="yui_3_17_2_1_1519269009607_105" style="position: relative;" data-html="” data-provider-name=””>

What upcoming projects can we look forward to seeing from you and/or Yumme Brand? [Well], last year I was able to hold an event entitled ”The Brown & Black Crayon Conversation” at libraries across the United States. During these events, I had the opportunity to talk to young girls about the importance of self-identity, self-love, self-confidence, and why it’s important to always use specific colors when coloring faces that have the same features as they may have. I absolutely loved hosting those events, so I am definitely going to do more this year.

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

For future events the topics will expand to incorporate young black girls, who live in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. We will also talk about young women, who are albino and are experiencing different stages of vitiligo. I incorporated this into our discussion, because there are times when we come across human beings with various skin pigmentation, [and] no black girl should be left out of these important conversations. You can also expect more products (including collaborations with music artists)! I’m not going to give away too many details, but I am also currently working on something for little boys!

Do you have anything else you want to share? Yes, if you have a dream, pursue it. I believe people are put on this earth for a specific reason and we are given different skills and talents to help us pursue the reason while we are here. Once the specific reason is found, that person should attempt to help impact the world by using his or her talents. Also, I would like to share that what you ultimately want to achieve in life never comes easy, but if you have trust, dedication, faith, and perseverance, you will always succeed.
Yes, Sis!

By Toi Banks https://www.spottieottieblackgirl.com/yes-sis/

What is Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy

Androgenic alopecia or male pattern baldness is a very common type of hair loss observed in both males and females. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous preparation of platelets in concentrated plasma. Although the optimal PRP platelet concentration is unclear, the current methods by which PRP is prepared report 300-700% enrichment, with platelet concentrations consequently increasing to more than 1,000,000 platelets/L.[] PRP has attracted attention in several medical fields because of its ability to promote wound healing.

Activation of alpha granules of platelets releases numerous proteins, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and interleukin (IL)-1.[,] It is hypothesised that growth factors released from platelets may act on stem cells in the bulge area of the follicles, stimulating the development of new follicles and promoting neovascularisation.[] The aim our pilot study was to evaluate the safety, efficacy and feasibility of PRP for treatment of androgenic alopecia.

Between August 2013 and November 2013, all patients suffering from androgenic alopecia and on topical minoxidil and finasteride for at least 6 months without much improvement were considered for PRP therapy. Written informed consent was obtained. All included patients were tested by ELISA for HIV, HBS Ag and platelet count. Exclusion criteria were haematological disorders, thyroid dysfunction, malnutrition and other dermatological disorders contributing to hair loss. A 1 cm × 1 cm square area was marked over right parietal area in mid-pupillary line, 10 cm proximal to right eyebrow in each patient. Baseline follicular units were manually counted with the help of trichoscan in this area by dividing into four small quadrants [Figures [Figures11 and and22].

Figure 1

Figure 1
Pre-treatment trichoscan image
Figure 2

Figure 2
Post-treatment trichoscan image

Before each session, the hair pull test was performed three times by the same clinician. All patients were advised to avoid washing hair two days prior to the treatment. A bundle of approximately 50-60 hair was grasped between the thumb, index and middle finger from the base close to the scalp. The hair was firmly tugged away from the scalp, and the extracted hair was counted in every session. To evaluate overall hair growth, hair volume, hair quality and fullness, global pictures were taken in every session from front, vertex, lateral and back view. Read more here: (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4134641/)

 

Hair Loss News

Lazy Girl Hair Hacks

As a self-professed “lazy girl,” formal events and special occasions can be more fuss and preparation than is ideal. Whether you’re preparing for a wedding or getting ready for a fancy date night, we’d like to skip right to the dancing and laughing, without hours spent styling.

Can you still be lazy, even when you have a special occasion? With these easy hair hacks, we’ll show you that it only takes a few minutes to create classy styles that are well-suited for your special occasion.

Lazy Girl Hair Hacks for Special Occasions_IG-1D

Perfect for a prom or other formal event, this Modern French Twist is an easy up-do. Start by prepping your hair with Bumble and Bumble Surf Spray, then finger-comb while blow drying on cold. Next, add volume by lightly teasing your crown, sides and ends. Then finger-comb your hair as though you were making a mid-height ponytail. Begin curling the hair at its ends and keep rolling until you reach your head. Loosen up the crown to add height. Secure the twist by weaving bobby pins through the hair — be sure not to flatten the twist. Lastly, spray to set. Voila!

If you’re getting ready for a fancy date night, this Beach Waves style is a perfect laid-back look that is going to go great with that new dress. Begin with damp hair and add mousse to your roots, then blow-dry. After that, prep your hair with heat defense spray. To add the waves to your locks, use a curling iron pointed at a 45-degree angle. Before your hair cools, use your fingers to break up the curls. Set using hairspray, with extra spray at the roots to boost volume. That was quick!

For a fancy up-do, try this Twisted Side Bun. Start with a side part and brush the front section of your hair straight down and to the side for a dramatic side-swept bang. Pin to secure. Then tease a little bit of hair at your crown to add height. Now divide your hair into top and bottom sections. With the bottom section, create a low, messy side bun by pulling hair halfway through the elastic and adding pins to secure. With the top section, twist hair and wrap it around the bun. Then pin to secure. Spray and you’re done!

If you’re headed to a wedding, this Polished Pompadour is a sleek and classy look. Plus, the style works well for both long and short hair. To start, separate the front section of your hair and pull it up straight. Then tease the back of the section to add volume, and spray. Now carefully smooth the front, maintaining the lift, and pin to secure. Next, gather the sides of your hair and brush to smooth. Secure the two sections with an elastic band, hiding the initial pins. Lightly mist with shine spray. So fancy, and so easy!

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jeff Chiarelli

Jeff Chiarelli

Jeff Chiarelli is the Director of Marketing at Ogle School. His responsibilities include managing Ogle School’s online, print, TV and outdoor advertising and branding and spreading the Ogle gospel.

https://www.ogleschool.edu/blog/lazy-girls-hair-hacks-special-occasions/

Part 1-4 Hair Weave And The Damage It’s Causing

JustPart 1: The Impact Hair Weave Has On Black Women. Has It Become Addictive?

Head2Toe Magazine takes a look into the impact hair weave has on black women and the community. We believe that black women have become so addicted to hair weave that it can almost be considered a drug. Hair weave has not only started a hair loss epidemic among black women, it has also become a crutch meaning women have become addicted to the convenience of wearing weave that they ignore the first signs that their hair needs a break from wearing weave. Hair weave is impacting the African-American communities because ever since the hair weave trend started a lot of black salons revenue started to decrease because black women started wearing more and more weaves and wigs, which meant they started going to the salon less and less.  So now the black salons are dealing with the natural hair trend on top of the weaving and wig trend ( another topic we will discuss later ).  A lot of black women have become blinded to what the actual meaning of what beautiful means and we are on a campaign to get black women back to wearing their own hair, and feeling beautiful when they do. “Whether Curly Or Straight, Relaxed Or Natural, Short Or Long My Hair Is Healthy and Strong”
 Leave us a comment or email us if you have a hair weave testimony. head2toemag@gmail.com  Make sure you read  read the hair loss facts below. If you are a hairstylist and you have a lot to say on this topic we would love to here from you!
nommomagazine pic
Photo from http://www.nommomagazine.com

There are 30 million women who are suffering from hair loss in the United States and 70% are African-American women.  We have a hair loss epidemic on our hands! There are many factors that can cause hair loss such as medications, nutrition, trauma, vitamin D deficiency, mechanical damage (tight hair weaves, braids etc) stress, chemical damage and so on.

Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. Alopecia areata (mild – medium level) usually shows in unusual hair loss areas e.g. eyebrows, backside of the head or above the ears where usually the male pattern baldness does not affect. In male-pattern hair loss, loss and thinning begin at the temples and the crown and either thins out or falls out. Female-pattern hair loss occurs at the frontal and parietal.

People have between 100,000 and 150,000 hairs on their head. The number of strands normally lost in a day varies, but on average is 100. In order to maintain a normal volume, hair must be replaced at the same rate at which it is lost. The first signs of hair thinning that people will often notice are more hairs than usual left in the hairbrush after brushing or in the basin after shampooing. Styling can also reveal areas of thinning, such as a wider parting or a thinning crown.

Skin conditions

A substantially blemished face, back and limbs could point to cystic acne. The most severe form of the condition, cystic acne arises from the same hormonal imbalances that cause hair loss, and is associated with dyhydrotestosterone production. Seborrheic  dermatitis, a condition in which an excessive amount of sebum is produced and builds up on the scalp (looking like an adult cradle cap) is also a symptom of hormonal imbalances, as is an excessively oily or dry scalp. Both can cause hair thinning.

Psychological

Hair thinning and baldness cause psychological stress due to their effect on appearance. Although societal interest in appearance has a long history, this particular branch of psychology came into its own during the 1960’s and has gained momentum as messages associating physical attractiveness with success and happiness grow more prevalent.

The psychology of hair thinning is a complex issue. Hair is considered an essential part of overall identity: especially for women, for whom it often represents femininity and attractiveness. Men typically associate a full head of hair with youth and vigor. Although they may be aware of pattern baldness in their family, many are uncomfortable talking about the issue. Hair thinning is therefore a sensitive issue for both sexes. For sufferers, it can represent a loss of control and feelings of isolation. People experiencing hair thinning often find themselves in a situation where their physical appearance is at odds with their own self-image and commonly worry that they appear older than they are or less attractive to others. Psychological problems due to baldness, if present, are typically most severe at the onset of symptoms.

Scalp Issues

An unhealthy scalp environment can play a significant role in hair thinning by contributing to miniaturization or causing damage. Air and water pollutants, environmental toxins, conventional styling products and excessive amounts of sebum have the potential to build up on the scalp. This debris can block hair follicles and cause their deterioration and consequent miniaturization of hair. It can also physically restrict hair growth or damage the hair cuticle, leading to hair that is weakened and easily broken off before its natural life cycle has ended.

We found this article below on WebMd http://www.webmd.com/beauty/hair-styling/scalp2tip-13/weaves-extensions?page=1

Wearing a weave or extensions in your hair can give you the volume and length you long for. But you’ll need to take extra care to make sure they don’t break your hair or pull it out.

“Anyone can wear extensions and still have healthy hair,” says Melanye Maclin, MD, a dermatologist and hair loss expert in Washington D.C. “You just have to take the time to show your natural hair and the weave some TLC.”

Here’s how to do it.

Prime Your Hair and Scalp

Get your hair in good shape before adding extensions. Take a break from the weakening chemicals in curl relaxers or dyes to get a head start in avoiding breakage.

Make sure your hair is clean, well conditioned, and free of buildup from dead skin cells and styling products like hairspray. These can cause dryness, flaking, and itching.

hair-damage-from-relaxerz-body dr oz contance vaugn

“If your scalp is dry and flaky, use a medicated shampoo that contains zinc pyrithione orselenium sulfide, concentrating the suds on your scalp,” Maclin says. Leave it on for 15 minutes and rinse out. Then wash once more with regular shampoo and condition. Do this once a week for 4 weeks.

If you’re still seeing flakes, visit a dermatologist before getting extensions. You may haveseborrheic dermatitis, which can be harder to get under control when you have extensions.

How Extensions Are Attached

How a hair extension is attached to your head depends on the type you use:

weave

Stay Loose

Maclin says the biggest mistake that women make with extensions is wearing them too tight. This puts a lot of tension on the hair follicles, which can make your hair fall out. At worst, it can contribute to the most common type of permanent hair loss in African-American women.

Getting extensions should not be painful or cause headaches. If it does, they’re too snug. Speak up! Ask your stylist to loosen them before continuing.

Clip-ins are the least damaging extensions because they can be removed quickly and require little to no glue or braiding. But they can cause hair breakage if they pull or snag your hair, so put them in loosely.

Don’t Skimp on Shampooing

“Gently shampoo at least once a week to keep your scalp at its healthiest,” says hairstylist Tamika Fletcher, co-owner of Natural Resources Salon in Houston. “This reduces the buildup of product used for styling your extensions and dead skin cells.”

  • If you wear clip-in extensions, remove them first. Clean and dry them separately before reattaching.
  • If your weave or extensions are sewn, bonded, or glued into your hair, separate your natural hair from them as best you can. Then wash, rinse, and condition your real hair separately from your faux hair. Towel-dry gently before you comb through or blow-dry.

Don’t Overdo It

Even if they still look neat and polished, don’t wear hair extensions for more than 6 weeks at a time. “Weaves should be removed to allow for a thorough cleaning of the scalp and deep conditioning of the hair,” Maclin says.

Hairloss in women

Take Care When Taking Extensions Out

The glue used to secure hair extensions to your head contains chemicals that can cause hair loss. “If bonding glue is absolutely necessary, use bonding glue remover not only to take out the extensions but, more importantly, to ensure no glue remains in the hair,” Fletcher says. “Any remaining glue can adhere to hair and become nearly impossible to remove without losing hair in the process.”

If your hairline or scalp itches after your weave is removed, you may have an allergic reaction. Formaldehyde is used to preserve hair weaves, and it sometimes causes irritation. See a dermatologist. They can treat an itchy or irritated scalp.

Part 2:

Self-esteem and Hair. Is there a connection?

A Black Woman’s Hair…….That phrase alone can transpire into so many different conversations, but we are going to continue our conversation on hair weave and the impact it has on black women and our communities. Many women and young girls are taking wearing hair weave way to lightly and some so called professionals are doing the same. Black women are putting their hair on sale meaning that they are looking for the cheapest hairstylist to install their weave, instead of a well educated licensed professional who cares about the health of the hair. If you can’t go in the salon and get the proper maintenance such as shampooing every 2 weeks, then you can’t afford to wear weave. If you can’t afford to have it taken down in a timely manner (6-8 weeks max) then you can’t afford to wear weave. If you don’t have any edges left and your hair is 5 different lengths, you can’t afford to wear weave 🙂

hair-damage-from-relaxerz-body

If you need to have major surgery do you look for the cheapest surgeon or the best surgeon? If you were accused of a crime that you didn’t commit do you look for the cheapest attorney or the best attorney? I know that most of you have seen how women are getting botched up trying to look like someone other than themselves because they are unhappy with who they are and what they look like. They can’t afford the best doctors so they search for the bootleg doctors and self-made plastic surgeons and risk their lives by letting an untrained person inject them with anything and letting them do it any where. Sometimes they get lucky and God spares their life and sometimes they never even make it to look in the mirror!

butt job

Well if you’re going to wear weave you shouldn’t be looking for the cheapest hairstylist because your hair is not on sale and it is a woman’s glory and that goes for any race of women! Cheap products and an untrained hairstylist=hair loss, brittle hair, no edges, breakage, low self-esteem, shame and so on. Just because your nephew best friend’s cousin charges $50 and knows how to sew hair in because he/she watched a few YouTube videos doesn’t mean that they are qualified to install hair in your head. Why pay $300 for hair and pay $50 to have it installed? Now that’s dumb! The thing is your hair will only hold up so long before you start seeing breakage and hair loss and most of the time women wait until the problem gets way out of hand and then they want to run to a professional and expect a miracle on 34th street talking about I don’t want it cut, bye Felecia! Hair loss is a serious issue because it can lead to all types of problems such as stress which only makes it worse, depression and low self-esteem. Hair loss can make going to work stressful as well as cause relationship problems. Head2Toe Magazine is on a mission to help black women get back to wearing weave because they want to not because they have to! Make sure you share this article! If you have a hair weave story please email us head2toemag@gmail.com. Read the relationship between hair loss and self-esteem below and stay tuned for Part 3! Hit that follow blog button on the sidebar to keep up with all of our controversial post!

“If you look in the mirror and you don’t like what you see without weave, you have more serious issues than you think”

When hair loss starts…..

The loss of the hairline can change a person’s appearance substantially. Hair loss changes the appearance of the face by shifting the balance of the face to the forehead, resulting in an aged appearance.

A study revealed that men who had more profound hair loss were more dissatisfied with their appearance and were more concerned with their older look than those with minimal hair loss. This effect cut across all age groups but was more prominent in the younger individuals.

Screen Shot 2014-05-12 at 1.47.16 PM

The research also indicates that women tend to be more upset than men by their hair loss. A 1992 study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology that compared the psychological impact of hair loss on men and women found that women had a more negative body image and were less able to adapt to the loss.

In fact, it has been scientifically proven through studies that women tend to suffer more emotionally and psychologically than men on losing hair. The results of these tests showed that women were much more worried about the way they looked than men. They tend to feel insecure about their appearance and how the world and the people around them will accept them.

Low self-esteem

Physical beauty is one of the cornerstones of self esteem and it is one of the most vulnerable. The self-esteem levels and other measures of self-worth drop significantly when hair loss occurs.

Loss of personal attractiveness and fear of not looking attractive to others

Hair is an important determinant of physical attractiveness and a mean of expressing individuality. Hair loss affects the individual’s feelings of attractiveness.

9c35728bb890ae66_Hair-loss

For balding women it is especially hard to live in a society that places great value on youthful appearance and attractiveness.

Because women are famous for spending a lot of time and money grooming, dying, curling, drying, and styling their hair to make it look its best, when they begin to lose their hair, it is extremely traumatic. This cosmetic setback is quite intense when a woman is used to having hair and suddenly finds herself losing it. They can have a lot of trouble dealing with the reality of hair loss.

Embarrassment, Loss of confidence, Shyness

Although full head of hair cannot guarantee instant confidence, studies have shown that in men who suffer from hair loss, nearly 75% of them feel less confident since the onset of the hair loss, especially in dealing with the opposite sex.

And it isn’t just men. Statistics regarding female hair loss are so difficult to compile mainly because of a tendency on the part of women with hair loss to camouflage and hide a condition that they feel stigmatized by.

Social teasing and humiliation

When hair loss reaches a stage of visible condition it can make the person the object of teasing or scorn.

Hairloss in women

Feelings of depression and introversion

In extreme circumstances, some people really take hair loss badly and get highly distressed about it, up to the point of getting into depression.

Some people make assumptions that they are losing something about their control of their life, things they really can’t reverse when they start losing their hair.

Subconscious emotions of envy and jealousy

Those suffering from hair loss often experience feeling of jealousy of women with full, healthy heads of hair, because they desperately covet what non-bald people have.

Work-related problems

Hair loss may affect someone who is in front of the camera or who needs to be in the public in a very devastating way professionally.

Negative effects on social life

Hair plays an important role in our social lives. Upon meeting someone, one of the first things you notice is their hair. Before a social engagement, it is very important for us to look good, and a good lock of hair is what completes our appearance. Those affected by hair loss become aware of how important hair is in our social lives quickly.

Hair loss may cause the person to limit social activities. Some people avoid seeing friends and stop going out except to work.

Surveys have shown that around 40% of women with alopecia have had marital problems, and around 63% claimed to have career related problems. Reference: (http://www.emedexpert.com/tips/hair-loss-effects.shtml)

Part 3:

Who’s Selling You The Weave?

We know that black women spend more money on hair weave, but who’s selling it and getting rich? The answer to that question isn’t hard to find being that on almost every corner in the African-American community there’s an Korean owned beauty supply store that caters to black hair care. Black women have always influenced the hair industry but fall short in the industry.

Black-Hair-Care-Industry-e1405359196243

Photo Credit: siddubuzzonline.blogspot.com

The Black hair care industry is grossly underestimated, and knowingly so. Market research firm Mintel estimated the size of the 2012 market at $684 million, with a projection of $761 million by 2017. But Mintel also wisely notes:

What’s missing from these figures are general market brands, weaves, extensions, wigs, independent beauty supply stores, distributors, e-commerce, styling tools and appliances. If all of those things were to be taken into consideration, the $684 million in expenditures could reach a whopping half trillion dollars.

 Half trillion, as is in $500 billion. That’s more than double Greece’s Gross Domestic Product.Hair is an important aspect of Black female culture, so it’s unsurprising that we potentially spend that much money on our hair. Good Hair, the 2009 documentary by comedian Chris Rock, shined a spotlight on the business of black hair, particularly our use of relaxers and weaves and the sources of the extensions so many women sew into their hair. Since Rock’s reveal of the industry, much has and hasn’t changed in the world of Black hair.

 What’s Stayed the Same: High Spending & Weaves

We’re still spending a lot of money on our hair. The market remained relatively unscathed during the recession, while other industries faltered and since then Black haircare has seen moderate but steady growth. All product categories within the market have factored into the industry’s overall growth, except for relaxer sales, which, since 2008 have declined.

According to Mintel, “Relaxers represent 21 percent of the black haircare market with expenditures at $152 million, down 15 percent since 2011 due to the natural hair trend.”

Interestingly enough, despite the growing move from relaxed hair to hair that is not chemically treated (natural hair), sales of weaves and wigs also experienced growth. Mintel reports “Nearly six out of 10 Black consumers wear a wig, weave or extensions, which enables them to switch up their look.”

Wigs and weaves may still be a part of Black hair culture because hair versatility is somewhat intrinsic to the culture. Many Black women change their hairstyles frequently, no matter the texture. Fake hair allows for even larger pool of hairstyle options and when used correctly, can give one’s real hair a break from manipulation and hence mitigate breakage. Reference: ( http://www.huffingtonpost.com/antonia-opiah/the-changing-business-of-_b_4650819.html )

Who’s Running the Game?

The Black hair care market is at least an $684 million industry. Hardly any of that cash makes it back to the Black community. A walk into your local beauty supply store will typically reveal a slew of brands that are Korean-owned.

Oddly enough, in 1965 the Korean government banned the export of raw hair, making it impossible for U.S. business owners to manufacture wigs using Korean tresses. Not long afterward, the U.S. government banned the import of any wig that contained hair from China. As a result, Korean business owners were able to dominate supply and distribution of weaves, wigs and extensions. Aaron Ranen’s 2006 Black Hair documentary estimates that Koreans own close to 60% of the Black hair care industry market share.

Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/style/black-women-need-to-take-back-the-hair-industry-887#ixzz3pEKFcXPy

korean beauty supply store
Photo Credit: bmawuFbp.blogspot.com

Part 4:

There’s so many-a girls I hear you been running from the beautiful queen that you could be becoming you can look at my palm and see the storm coming read the book of my life and see I’ve overcome it. Just because the length of your hair ain’t long and they criticize you for your skin tone wanna hold your head high because you’re a pretty woman, get your runway stride home and keep going, GIRL LEAVE YA LIFE #MaryJBlige

Should you care that your husband/boyfriend doesn’t like you wearing weave? This is a very debatable topic. Before we can discuss men not liking their significate other wearing weave we must first discuss how some men are in relationships with women and they don’t have a clue that she’s even wearing weave!  The question to be answered is how many of those women allow him to believe it’s her hair? There are some women who have been in their relationship for years and have never let their man see their real hair. This is not what I was told. I’ve actually had this conversation with a couple of women who have never let their husband/boyfriend see their real hair! Is this a lie or should it be in the same category as Don’t Ask Don’t Tell? Some people say it’s not a lie unless he ask if it’s her real hair and she says yes, but some people feel allowing him to believe that it’s her real hair is just as bad as verbally saying yes this is my hair. There are a lot of men who can’t tell if it’s her real hair and she can have an invisible part as wide as the Nile River and he still wouldn’t know. 2im3jvr

It’s crazy that this can become an issue in some relationships but how can a woman get upset if he gets mad when he finds out that she’s been living a lie or should I say she’s been lying to him? Think about it, she didn’t trust him enough to believe that he would fall for her without the weave or is it that she doesn’t have enough confidence in herself to know that if a man can’t love her without the weave then he’s not the man for her? Should we actually care what our husband/boyfriend likes if it makes us feel beautiful? We should be able to wear weave when we feel like we need a change, or to see how a short look would on us before we decide to get our real hair cut, or just to give our real hair a break.

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Weave shouldn’t be worn on a continuous basis and you should wear weave because you want to not because you have to. The damage that weave is causing in the African-American community has become an epidemic. Weave is causing high school girls to fight over the phrase, “That’s why you ain’t got no edges bitch”. Weave damage is just another thing to add to the vicious circle among black women that started way back in the days of slavery. Weave is causing conflict in some black relationships. Weave is causing black women to have low self-esteem after their hair and scalp has become damaged from wearing weave. Take a listen to Mary J. Blige below….

 

 

I found the article below on http://nommomagazine.com/2013/12/18/black-men-and-weaves/

Following the publishing of my latest article, “Natural or Not: A Discussion on Natural Hair vs. Weaves,” many female students of color on campus approached me to further discuss this phenomenon among the Afrikan American community. In our talks, the subject of Black men and their feelings toward our hair entered the conversations frequently. Many of the women I spoke to expressed their confusion about what Black men really want in regards to their woman’s physical appearance. Besides assumptions on their preferential body type and skin tone, many of these ladies felt that a woman of color’s hair was also important to a Black man, especially when it comes to weaves. The ladies even went so far as to request that I discuss this in a published article.

The question of the Black male’s feelings towards Black hair has experienced a new found popularity as the Natural Hair Movement progresses. Black women want to know, What do Black men want? The media has also given breadth to this discussion with its relaying of news stories related to the question.

Recently, a preacher banned weaves in his church. Pastor A.J. Aamir, founder of Resurrecting Faith in Waco, Texas expressed his feelings about weaves in a statement to AmericanPreachers.com, “Our Black women are getting weaves trying to be something and someone they are not. Be real with yourself.”

With a sudden influx of questions regarding Black men and weaves, I decided not to wait to fill in my ladies on what Black men want. I approached three of our very own Black male Bruins who, although asserting that they are not speaking for all Black men, were kind enough to share their thoughts on the subject.

Here’s what Donte Miller and Lamar Greenwood, third year Sociology Majors and Education Minors  and (Anonymous), third year Philosophy major had to say about Black women and their hair.

Donte Miller/ Third year Sociology major UCLA

Among yourself and your Black male peers what do you believe is the general feeling towards weaves?

Donte: The general feeling towards weave is very black or white. Most guys that I know find that weaves take away from the actual beauty of a woman because she feels a need to put in some type of extra hair to try to impress us. Other guys feel that it is extra, but if it is kept up and makes a woman look good, feel better and presentable then they’re fine.

Lamar: I believe the general consensus amongst Black men, concerning weaves, is a negative one. I do not understand, nor have an idea, where it may stem from, but I do believe that the general Black men population think of weaves lower than natural hair.

Anonymous: I can’t really speak on everyone’s behalf, but I don’t particularly like weaves. I’d assume (in my bias) that Black men in general don’t like the thought of weaves, but are intrigued by the end results… Reminds me of a Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air episode: Will gets locked in the attic with his gorgeous prom date. As the episode progresses she begins taking off her fake nails, then her fake eyelashes and eventually her fake hair. It’s sort of like the episode; the way it makes women look is intriguing to Black men in general (I think), but the idea/knowing that it’s fake is what turns us away.

Do you prefer your female partner to wear her hair in a specific way, i.e. natural or weave?

Donte: If I had a girl I’d prefer her to wear her hair whichever way is going to make her look presentable and taken care of. There are some women with bomb natural hair, but there are some who just don’t treat it right and the same goes for weaves.

Lamar: I personally don’t have a preference. If there is a preference, it is much more related to my first interaction with a woman, rather than her having a weave or natural hair. If I met a female with a weave, and found her attractive, then I usually prefer that she looks as she did then. But, if I met her with her natural hair, I would prefer for her to look like that.

Anonymous: I’d prefer my women to wear her hair naturally. Again I’m biased in my response because the woman this question brings to mind has an abundant amount of natural hair. If she’s my partner, I need to be able to run my hand over her hair, grab her hair from the base – admire her natural beauty. Natural’s my preference.

Why do you think that Black women have this perception that Black men hate weaves?

Donte: They have that perception because they have been chastised by guys about their hair for years and don’t feel accepted by the men they’re trying to impress. However, many do assume and generalize all guys. They feel like they must wear their hair a certain way or no one at all will like them, which is wrong. They also feel like it’s just them fighting, but guys worry too about always having to have fresh shoes or a lineup, fade, or fro. If its not attractive to a girl they feel a certain way at times. I don’t think it’s as extreme, but it’s there.

Lamar: I think Black women feel like that because of the way that weaves are presented. A lot of Black women believe that Black men prefer straight hair. Although weaves can be straight, it is less likely to be so (at least from my perspective). So, since weaves are presented in forms such as braids, twists, etc., Black women believe that Black men despise weaves. There may be some overlap, but that is a different issue stemming from outside of my statement.

 Anonymous: Hate is a strong word, but we do.

Author: Mia Brumfield

I’m going to end Part 4 with India Arie I am not my hair…….Make sure you share your thoughts and please share this post!

 

Zinc And Hair Loss

Zinc Facts

Before anything else, here are some facts about zinc that you should know. First, zinc is a trace mineral that is found in the body. It plays a vital part in many bodily processes and functions such as in cell reproduction, hormonal balance, proper absorption of vitamins, and in protein synthesis. All these processes are vital for proper hair growth such that an adequate amount of this mineral is needed to prevent hair thinning and loss.

Causes of Hair Loss

You must know that a certain amount of hair loss everyday is normal. We usually shed off about 50 to a hundred hair each day, and this should not be a cause of alarm since it will not necessarily lead to permanent hair loss. This shedding is equivalent to the number of hair that grows. But, if you happen to shed more than average, you may want to find out what causes this shedding. Hair loss can be caused by various reasons such as hormones, genetics, poor diet and nutrition, age, radiation or chemotherapy treatment, stress, infections, chemicals, rapid weight loss, or other diseases. The most common cause of hair loss is poor nutrition.

Zinc and Hair Loss

Hair LossDeficiency in zinc can contribute a lot to hair shedding because without zinc and other related minerals, you hair shafts get weakened, causing hair breakage and very slow hair regrowth. Zinc benefits for hairinclude promotion of cell reproduction, tissue growth and repair of broken tissues. It also maintains the oil-secreting glands that are attached to your hair follicles, thus decreasing their chances of falling off.

Zinc Hair Treatment

There are various zinc supplements now available in the market. They are usually used to counter zinc deficiencies, but one of the secondary uses of zinc supplement is to fight hair thinning and hair loss. Usually, zinc gluconate at a dose level of 50 or 60 milligrams per day for two weeks is recommended. Other forms ofzinc supplements are zinc oxide, zinc chloride and zinc sulfate.

Zinc Selenium Hair Loss Treatment

Aside from zinc, the mineral selenium is also associated with hair loss. Selenium, along with zinc, can help your body properly utilize proteins and hormones to produce more hair. It has also been found that vitamin A , C, E and vitamin B6 aid these two minerals in promoting hair regrowth.

Excess Zinc and Hair Loss

Well, there is a certain truth in the studies that claim that zinc can also trigger hair loss. BUT! Hair loss can only be triggered by too much zinc in the body. The recommended daily amount of zinc is only about 11 milligrams. To counter hair loss, a dosage of 60 milligrams is effective. Taking too much or taking zinc supplements longer than recommended (more than three or four weeks) would do more harm than good to your hair. This is very probable because too much zinc in the body can hinder the absorption of other minerals such as copper, iron, magnesium and manganese, all of which may also take part in maintaining healthy hair. For instance, copper helps in forming blood vessels so that lack of it may be detrimental to the scalp and may limit the growth of your hair. In summary, there is a close knit relationship between zinc and hair loss. The bottom line is that too much zinc in your body would cause hair loss, but too much of it and you lose hair, as well. Thus, for safety and better results, take them only as prescribed.

Article found here:http://www.nutritional-supplements-health-guide.com/zinc-and-hair-loss.html

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