Hair Weave And The Damage It’s Causing

Part 1: The Impact Hair Weave Has On Black Women. Has It Become Addictive?

Head2Toe Magazine takes a look into the impact hair weave has on black women and the community. We believe that black women have become so addicted to hair weave that it can almost be considered a drug. Hair weave has not only started a hair loss epidemic among black women, it has also become a crutch meaning women have become addicted to the convenience of wearing weave that they ignore the first signs that their hair needs a break from wearing weave. Hair weave is impacting the African-American communities because ever since the hair weave trend started a lot of black salons revenue started to decrease because black women started wearing more and more weaves and wigs, which meant they started going to the salon less and less.  So now the black salons are dealing with the natural hair trend on top of the weaving and wig trend ( another topic we will discuss later ).  A lot of black women have become blinded to what the actual meaning of what beautiful means and we are on a campaign to get black women back to wearing their own hair, and feeling beautiful when they do. “Whether Curly Or Straight, Relaxed Or Natural, Short Or Long My Hair Is Healthy and Strong”
We are currently conducting video interviews with black women about hair weave and the impact that it has on black women. Leave us a comment or email us if you have a hair weave testimony. head2toemag@gmail.com  Make sure you read  read the hair loss facts below. If you are a hairstylist and you have a lot to say on this topic we would love to here from you!
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Photo from www.nommomagazine.com

There are 30 million women who are suffering from hair loss in the United States and 70% are African-American women.  We have a hair loss epidemic on our hands! There are many factors that can cause hair loss such as medications, nutrition, trauma, vitamin D deficiency, mechanical damage (tight hair weaves, braids etc) stress, chemical damage and so on.

Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. Alopecia areata (mild – medium level) usually shows in unusual hair loss areas e.g. eyebrows, backside of the head or above the ears where usually the male pattern baldness does not affect. In male-pattern hair loss, loss and thinning begin at the temples and the crown and either thins out or falls out. Female-pattern hair loss occurs at the frontal and parietal.

People have between 100,000 and 150,000 hairs on their head. The number of strands normally lost in a day varies, but on average is 100. In order to maintain a normal volume, hair must be replaced at the same rate at which it is lost. The first signs of hair thinning that people will often notice are more hairs than usual left in the hairbrush after brushing or in the basin after shampooing. Styling can also reveal areas of thinning, such as a wider parting or a thinning crown.

Skin conditions

A substantially blemished face, back and limbs could point to cystic acne. The most severe form of the condition, cystic acne arises from the same hormonal imbalances that cause hair loss, and is associated with dyhydrotestosterone production. Seborrheic  dermatitis, a condition in which an excessive amount of sebum is produced and builds up on the scalp (looking like an adult cradle cap) is also a symptom of hormonal imbalances, as is an excessively oily or dry scalp. Both can cause hair thinning.

Psychological

Hair thinning and baldness cause psychological stress due to their effect on appearance. Although societal interest in appearance has a long history, this particular branch of psychology came into its own during the 1960’s and has gained momentum as messages associating physical attractiveness with success and happiness grow more prevalent.

The psychology of hair thinning is a complex issue. Hair is considered an essential part of overall identity: especially for women, for whom it often represents femininity and attractiveness. Men typically associate a full head of hair with youth and vigor. Although they may be aware of pattern baldness in their family, many are uncomfortable talking about the issue. Hair thinning is therefore a sensitive issue for both sexes. For sufferers, it can represent a loss of control and feelings of isolation. People experiencing hair thinning often find themselves in a situation where their physical appearance is at odds with their own self-image and commonly worry that they appear older than they are or less attractive to others. Psychological problems due to baldness, if present, are typically most severe at the onset of symptoms.

Scalp Issues

An unhealthy scalp environment can play a significant role in hair thinning by contributing to miniaturization or causing damage. Air and water pollutants, environmental toxins, conventional styling products and excessive amounts of sebum have the potential to build up on the scalp. This debris can block hair follicles and cause their deterioration and consequent miniaturization of hair. It can also physically restrict hair growth or damage the hair cuticle, leading to hair that is weakened and easily broken off before its natural life cycle has ended.

We found this article below on WebMd http://www.webmd.com/beauty/hair-styling/scalp2tip-13/weaves-extensions?page=1

Wearing a weave or extensions in your hair can give you the volume and length you long for. But you’ll need to take extra care to make sure they don’t break your hair or pull it out.

“Anyone can wear extensions and still have healthy hair,” says Melanye Maclin, MD, a dermatologist and hair loss expert in Washington D.C. “You just have to take the time to show your natural hair and the weave some TLC.”

Here’s how to do it.

Prime Your Hair and Scalp

Get your hair in good shape before adding extensions. Take a break from the weakening chemicals in curl relaxers or dyes to get a head start in avoiding breakage.

Make sure your hair is clean, well conditioned, and free of buildup from dead skin cells and styling products like hairspray. These can cause dryness, flaking, and itching.

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“If your scalp is dry and flaky, use a medicated shampoo that contains zinc pyrithione orselenium sulfide, concentrating the suds on your scalp,” Maclin says. Leave it on for 15 minutes and rinse out. Then wash once more with regular shampoo and condition. Do this once a week for 4 weeks.

If you’re still seeing flakes, visit a dermatologist before getting extensions. You may haveseborrheic dermatitis, which can be harder to get under control when you have extensions.

How Extensions Are Attached

How a hair extension is attached to your head depends on the type you use:

  • A partial or full weave is sewn into tight braids of your own hair.
  • Extensions are bonded to your hair with a type of glue. You may need 50 to 100 of them, depending on the thickness of your hair.
  • Clip-in extensions add volume or length in a hurry. You attach them under the top layer of your hair.

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Stay Loose

Maclin says the biggest mistake that women make with extensions is wearing them too tight. This puts a lot of tension on the hair follicles, which can make your hair fall out. At worst, it can contribute to the most common type of permanent hair loss in African-American women.

Getting extensions should not be painful or cause headaches. If it does, they’re too snug. Speak up! Ask your stylist to loosen them before continuing.

Clip-ins are the least damaging extensions because they can be removed quickly and require little to no glue or braiding. But they can cause hair breakage if they pull or snag your hair, so put them in loosely.

Don’t Skimp on Shampooing

“Gently shampoo at least once a week to keep your scalp at its healthiest,” says hairstylist Tamika Fletcher, co-owner of Natural Resources Salon in Houston. “This reduces the buildup of product used for styling your extensions and dead skin cells.”

  • If you wear clip-in extensions, remove them first. Clean and dry them separately before reattaching.
  • If your weave or extensions are sewn, bonded, or glued into your hair, separate your natural hair from them as best you can. Then wash, rinse, and condition your real hair separately from your faux hair. Towel-dry gently before you comb through or blow-dry.

Don’t Overdo It

Even if they still look neat and polished, don’t wear hair extensions for more than 6 weeks at a time. “Weaves should be removed to allow for a thorough cleaning of the scalp and deep conditioning of the hair,” Maclin says.

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Take Care When Taking Extensions Out

The glue used to secure hair extensions to your head contains chemicals that can cause hair loss. “If bonding glue is absolutely necessary, use bonding glue remover not only to take out the extensions but, more importantly, to ensure no glue remains in the hair,” Fletcher says. “Any remaining glue can adhere to hair and become nearly impossible to remove without losing hair in the process.”

If your hairline or scalp itches after your weave is removed, you may have an allergic reaction. Formaldehyde is used to preserve hair weaves, and it sometimes causes irritation. See a dermatologist. They can treat an itchy or irritated scalp.

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 Stayed tuned for our upcoming video!

 

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